California Pear

California grown pears are juicy, sweet and nutritional. California grows several different varieties of pears in some of the best growing conditions in the world which result in a Superior pear. California grown pears are both safe and great tasting. Try some today!
¥3.57 ~ ¥7.33

General information

Name: USA Pear

Alias: Western Pear


Growing Region:

California Pears are grown in throughout the state.  Primarily in Lake, Sacramento, Mendocino, El Dorado, San Joaquin, Yolo, Sutter and Yuba Counties.  


Main Varieties:

Bartlett  Variety

Bartlett is the most popular variety.  When ripe the skin changes from green to a golden color. It is one of the sweetest pears and has a white flesh. 

bartlett pear

Golden Bosc Variety

The Golden Bosc has unique longer neck than the other pear varieties.   The light rustic-green color does not change skin color when ripe.   It has a sweet, somewhat spicy, dense white flesh.  It can be eaten fresh or used to bake and cook with. 

Golden Bosc Pears

Comince Variety

The Comince is a semi-round pear is among the sweetest pears grown with a rich buttery flavor when ripe.  Comince does not change color when ripe.   It ripe when the neck yields to gentle pressure.

Comince Pears

Seckel Variety

Seckel is smaller in size than the other varieties.  It is sweeter than any of the other varieties – it is sometimes called the sugar pear.  It does not change color when ripe.  It is ready to eat when it become soft around the stem.

Seckel Pears

Red Variety

Red pears have a dull red skin when growing, a short neck and a thick stem.  They become bright red in color when ripe but soften at the neck when ready to eat.

red pears

General information

Name: USA Pear

Alias: Western Pear


Growing Region:

California Pears are grown in throughout the state.  Primarily in Lake, Sacramento, Mendocino, El Dorado, San Joaquin, Yolo, Sutter and Yuba Counties.  


Main Varieties:

Bartlett  Variety

Bartlett is the most popular variety.  When ripe the skin changes from green to a golden color. It is one of the sweetest pears and has a white flesh. 

bartlett pear

Golden Bosc Variety

The Golden Bosc has unique longer neck than the other pear varieties.   The light rustic-green color does not change skin color when ripe.   It has a sweet, somewhat spicy, dense white flesh.  It can be eaten fresh or used to bake and cook with. 

Golden Bosc Pears

Comince Variety

The Comince is a semi-round pear is among the sweetest pears grown with a rich buttery flavor when ripe.  Comince does not change color when ripe.   It ripe when the neck yields to gentle pressure.

Comince Pears

Seckel Variety

Seckel is smaller in size than the other varieties.  It is sweeter than any of the other varieties – it is sometimes called the sugar pear.  It does not change color when ripe.  It is ready to eat when it become soft around the stem.

Seckel Pears

Red Variety

Red pears have a dull red skin when growing, a short neck and a thick stem.  They become bright red in color when ripe but soften at the neck when ready to eat.

red pears

The beauty of pears is more than just skin deep. This is a fruit with a healthy personality, too - the kind of fruit you want to have around all the time. That they are luscious and satisfying goes without question. But pears also possess these fine nutritional points:

  • Low in calories
  • Contain no fat, cholesterol or sodium
  • A delicious source of energy (carbohydrates)
  • High in fiber
  • A good source of vitamin C
  • Contain natural antioxidants

And that’s just the basics. There’s much, much more to tell.

1 medium pear has 100 calories, 0 fat, 0 cholesterol, 0 sodium, 26g CHO (6 g fiber; 16g sugar); 10% vitamin C; 2% calcium; 190 mg potassium.

Soluble fiber has also been associated with lower blood pressure and reduced inflammation. While short-term inflammation is part of the body’s natural defenses and critical to healing from injuries or infections, it is not good for the body to remain in this state, known as chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation is extremely damaging and considered the root of many diseases including heart disease among others.

Soluble fiber also helps to slow the absorption of carbohydrates which may help people with diabetes in controlling their blood sugar levels. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder affecting the body’s ability to secrete insulin and use blood sugar for energy. A key component of managing diabetes is to control blood sugar levels, and slower absorption of carbohydrates is very beneficial.

Insoluble fiber helps maintain a healthy GI tract by moving foods through the body efficiently. Fiber in general helps promote satiety, or a feeling of fullness, which can be helpful in weight loss or weight maintenance efforts. A diet that includes insoluble fiber has also been associated with a reduced risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes.

Now here’s the beauty part: Pears contain a mix of both soluble and insoluble fiber, offering a total of 6 grams of fiber in just one medium-size pear. That makes pears one of the top food choices for fiber. Just one pear each day gets you well on your way!

Pears and Fiber

Pears are an excellent source of fiber, offering women a whopping 24% of their recommended daily intake of fiber! That’s great news, because most Americans have trouble achieving the recommended goals for fiber consumption.*Getting enough fiber on a daily basis is critical to maintaining health – from helping to achieve or maintain a healthy weight, healthy lipid profiles, stable blood sugar, and normal gastrointestinal (GI) function.

In order to tell the full story about the benefits of pear fiber, it’s helpful to understand what the different types of fiber are.

Total dietary fiber refers to plant cell wall components that our intestines can’t digest - this is actually a good thing. There are two types of dietary fiber: soluble fiber refers to the dietary fiber components that dissolve in water to form a gel-like material, while insoluble fiber cannot be dissolved and remains intact as it passes through the GI tract.

*Recommended intake is 25g fiber for women and 38g fiber for men. After 50, fiber needs decrease to 21g for women and 30g for men. (Source: American Dietetic Association).

The “Wow” Benefits of Fiber

Both soluble and insoluble types of fiber provide unique health benefits:

Soluble fiber plays a role in reducing cholesterol levels by lowering LDL cholesterol and helping to maintain healthy lipid profiles. Lipids are blood fats, mainly fatty acids and cholesterol, which are characterized by their size and chemical structure and influence on metabolism. Elevated levels of blood lipids are a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Soluble fiber has also been associated with lower blood pressure and reduced inflammation. While short-term inflammation is part of the body’s natural defenses and critical to healing from injuries or infections, it is not good for the body to remain in this state, known as chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation is extremely damaging and considered the root of many diseases including heart disease among others.

Soluble fiber also helps to slow the absorption of carbohydrates which may help people with diabetes in controlling their blood sugar levels. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder affecting the body’s ability to secrete insulin and use blood sugar for energy. A key component of managing diabetes is to control blood sugar levels, and slower absorption of carbohydrates is very beneficial.

Insoluble fiber helps maintain a healthy GI tract by moving foods through the body efficiently. Fiber in general helps promote satiety, or a feeling of fullness, which can be helpful in weight loss or weight maintenance efforts. A diet that includes insoluble fiber has also been associated with a reduced risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes.

Now here’s the beauty part: Pears contain a mix of both soluble and insoluble fiber, offering a total of 6 grams of fiber in just one medium-size pear. That makes pears one of the top food choices for fiber. Just one pear each day gets you well on your way!

Weight Management

Health experts worldwide recognize the critical role of weight management in helping to achieve optimal health. With record levels of obesity – in adults and children - and increased incidence of the detrimental health effects that may result, this growing issue has taken center stage.

According to the American Heart Association obesity is a major health risk factor that can lead to a shortened life span – on average 6 to 7 years less than a normal weight individual. Why? Obesity is linked to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) recommends maintaining a healthy weight throughout life to decrease the chance of developing cancer. It notes on its website that there is convincing evidence that (excess) body fat increases the risk for cancers of the esophagus, pancreas, colon, rectum, endometrium, kidney and breast (the latter in post-menopausal women.) Further, the AICR states that “maintaining a healthy weight may be the single most important way to protect against cancer.”

Research also indicates that being overweight can result in insulin resistance: When we eat, our food turns into glucose, a normal blood sugar that is used for energy. Insulin facilitates the uptake of glucose from the blood to our cells, so that it can be used by the body. If a person is insulin resistant, the body becomes less responsive to insulin and blood glucose isn’t taken up by the cells as readily, which results in high blood sugar.

Insulin resistance has long been linked with Type 2 diabetes, however today it is also linked to other diseases including cardiovascular disease and cancer and Alzheimer’s. Insulin resistance is also a key risk factor in what is known as Metabolic Syndrome, which is a group of risk factors that includes elevated insulin levels along with increased blood pressure, high glucose levels, excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal cholesterol levels. Having at least three of these risk factors indicates Metabolic Syndrome and the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes is increased.

Maintaining a healthy weight is critical to good health. Pears have an important role to play in weight management: being naturally low in calories and fat is critical, but fiber - plus deliciousness - are also key.

Fighting Disease

Today research is underway regarding the role that pears may play in helping to maintain health. Fresh pears offer health advantages in a number of ways including a strong nutritional profile that includes significant amounts of fiber, potassium, and vitamin C. Pears, like other fruits and vegetables, contain a vast array of naturally occurring beneficial plant compounds, known as phytochemicals, many of which act as antioxidants. Pears are also a good source of vitamin C, which is also a well-known, powerful antioxidant.

Antioxidants may help promote health by neutralizing unstable molecules in the body known as free radicals which can damage healthy cells. Research suggests that this damage can contribute to heart disease, cancer and an array of other conditions. Free radicals are formed both naturally in our bodies, through normal cell metabolism and through external environmental factors such as smoking, sunlight and pollution. As we age, we are producing more free radicals.

Getting antioxidants into your diet, through natural, whole food sources such as fruits and vegetables is considered superior to supplements.

Maintaining a healthy heart is, of course, critical to good health. Heart disease occurs when the arteries supplying blood to the heart become stiff and narrow due to the build-up of plaque in the artery walls. Many factors contribute to heart disease including diet and lifestyle, age and genes. Specific key risk factors include smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, being overweight and/or inactive, and diabetes.

The good news is that diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol, and rich in fruits (such as pears), vegetables, and grain products that contain fiber, particularly soluble fiber, may reduce the risk of heart disease.

Pears can play a role in helping to maintain heart health on a number of levels:

  • With no fat, saturated fat or cholesterol, pears can replace fatty foods in the diet.
  • While offering beneficial potassium, but no sodium, as part of a nutritious diet pears may help to promote a healthy blood pressure
  • Rich in fiber – both insoluble and soluble – pears may help contribute to healthy cholesterol levels, as part of a healthy diet. Additionally, foods that are good sources of fiber contribute to satiety (feeling full) and thus can also contribute to achieving or maintaining a healthy weight.

For more information about heart health, please visit the website of the American Heart Association or theNational Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Cancer Prevention

Cancer is characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells in the body. It has many causes and stages in its development. Genetic and environmental risk factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, being overweight, exposure to chemicals and dietary behaviors are all potential contributors to this disease.

For cancer prevention, it is critical to 1) avoid smoking, 2) make healthy food choices, and 3) to stay lean and active. Being overweight increases the risk of certain types of cancers, specifically those of the esophagus, breast, colon, kidney and uterus.

Research shows that consumption of vegetables and fruits may protect against a range of cancers, including mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, stomach, lung, pancreas and prostate. It is important to consume at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables each day -and ideally - even more. Fruits, such as pears, and vegetables may help protect against cancer because they are naturally low in fat, and provide vitamins and minerals, antioxidants and other phytochemicals that work together to lower risk.

The bottom line: Health experts agree that eating a diet low in fat and high in fruits and vegetables, foods that are low in fat and may contain vitamin A, vitamin C and dietary fiber, may reduce the risk of some cancers. Pears, a food low in fat, are a good source of fiber and vitamin C.

For more information about cancer and prevention visit the websites of the American Cancer Society, theNational Cancer Institute.





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