California Pecan

The Pecan is the only native nut crop to North America. The name “pecan” is a Native American word of Algonquin origin that was used to describe “all nuts requiring a stone to crack.” Pecan is a type of hickory, most significant as a nut crop. However, the wood from the tree is also used in agricultural implements, baseball bats, hammer handles, furniture, wall paneling, flooring, religious carvings and firewood.
¥57.18

Growing Regions 

Pecan production in California stretches from Chico-Orland area in the north to Bakersfield in the south.  There is some production as far south as San Diego County, and in the southeast desert areas of the state.   California is now the 7th largest of 14 pecan producing states, based on the last five years production.

Crop Size

 2012

Georgia  - 100,000,000 lbs

New Mexico – 65,000,000 lbs

Texas – 55,000,000 lbs

Oklahoma – 25,000,000 lbs

California – 1,330,000 lbs

2013

Georgia  - 75,000,000 lbs

New Mexico – unavailable

Texas  – unavailable

Oklahoma – unavailable

California – 3,500,000 lbs

 

 

2014

Georgia – unavailable

New Mexico – unavailable

Texas  – unavailable

Oklahoma – unavailable

California – 4,000,000 lbs


Growing Regions 

Pecan production in California stretches from Chico-Orland area in the north to Bakersfield in the south.  There is some production as far south as San Diego County, and in the southeast desert areas of the state.   California is now the 7th largest of 14 pecan producing states, based on the last five years production.

Crop Size

 2012

Georgia  - 100,000,000 lbs

New Mexico – 65,000,000 lbs

Texas – 55,000,000 lbs

Oklahoma – 25,000,000 lbs

California – 1,330,000 lbs

2013

Georgia  - 75,000,000 lbs

New Mexico – unavailable

Texas  – unavailable

Oklahoma – unavailable

California – 3,500,000 lbs

 

 

2014

Georgia – unavailable

New Mexico – unavailable

Texas  – unavailable

Oklahoma – unavailable

California – 4,000,000 lbs



Nutrient

Units

1 Oz (28.35g)
(20 Halves)

Energy (Calories)

kcal

195.899

Protein

g

2.600

Total Lipid (Fat)

g

20.403

Carbohydrate

g

3.929

Fiber, total dietary

g

2.722

Sugars, total

g

1.125

Minerals

Calcium

mg

19.845

Iron

mg

0.717

Magnesium

mg

34.304

Phosphorus

mg

78.530

Potassium

mg

116.235

Sodium

mg

0.000

Zinc

mg

1.284

Copper

mg

0.340

Manganese

mg

1.276

Selenium

mg

1.701

Vitamins

Vitamin C

mg

0.312

Thiamin

mg

0.187

Riboflavin

mg

0.037

Niacin

mg

0.331

Pantothenic Acid

mg

0.245

Vitamin B-6

mg

0.060

Folate, total

mcg

6.237

Folic Acid

mcg

0.000

Vitamin B-12

mcg

0.000

Vitamin A, IU

IU

21.830

Vitamin E

mg.ATE

1.148

Tocopherol, alpha

mg

0.397

Tocopherol, beta

mg

0.111

Tocopherol, gamma

mg

6.929

Tocopherol, delta

mg

0.133

Lipids

Fatty Acids, total saturated 

g

1.752

Fatty Acids, total monounsaturated

g

11.567

Fatty Acids, total polyunsaturated

g

6.128

Cholesterol

mg

0.000

Phytosterols

mg

28.917

Beta-sitosterol

mg

25.232






























Frequent consumption of nuts is associated with decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effect of pecans rich in monounsaturated fat as an alternative to the Step 1 diet in modifying serum lipids and lipoproteins in men and women with normal to moderately high serum cholesterol. In a single-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover feeding study, we assigned 23 subjects (mean age: 38 y; 9 women, 14 men) to follow two diets, each for 4 wk: a Step I diet and a pecan-enriched diet (accomplished by proportionately reducing all food items in a Step I diet by one fifth for a 20% isoenergetic replacement with pecans). The percentage of energy from fat in the two diets was 28.3 and 39.6%, respectively. Both diets improved the lipid profile; however, the pecan-enriched diet decreased both serum total and LDL cholesterol by 0.32 mmol/L (6.7 and 10.4%, respectively) and triglyceride by 0.14 mmol/L (11.1%) beyond the Step I diet, while increasing HDL cholesterol by 0.06 mmol/L (2.5 mg/dL). Serum apolipoprotein B and lipoprotein(a) decreased by 11.6 and 11.1%, respectively, and apolipoprotein A1 increased by 2.2% when subjects consumed the pecan compared with the Step I diet. These differences were all significant (P < 0.05). A 20% isoenergetic replacement of a Step I diet with pecans favorably altered the serum lipid profile beyond the Step I diet, without increasing body weight. Nuts such as pecans that are rich in monounsaturated fat may therefore be recommended as part of prescribed cholesterol-lowering diet of patients or habitual diet of healthy individuals.

Research Finds Pecans Added to a Regular Diet Can Lower "Bad" and Total Cholesterol

ATLANTA (March 13, 2000) - Pecans, loved for centuries for their outstanding taste, should no longer be viewed as a holiday indulgence. These delicious nuts can add flavor, crunch, and texture to just about any meal or snack. Now, a study at New Mexico State University (NMSU) finds that pecans offer something even more important than great taste and versatility - a positive impact on health.

The research, conducted by NMSU's Wanda Morgan, Ph.D., shows that adding pecans to a self-selected diet lowers LDL or "bad" cholesterol levels by six percent; total cholesterol levels were lower as well. This encouraging news about the positive impact of pecans on heart health was published in the March 2000 issue of Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

In this study, nineteen men and women with normal blood lipid levels were divided into two groups, one of which served as the "control" group, and ate its regular diet for eight weeks. Subjects in the "test" (pecan-eaters) group, however, supplemented their diets with ¾ cup of pecans every day. 

Even though the test group ate more total fat, monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat each day than those who did not eat pecans, test subjects lowered their levels of bad and total cholesterol - and did not gain weight. "The research shows that we don't have to be afraid of the fat in pecans," says Dr. Morgan. "Pecans can be a part of a balanced and varied diet."

Pecans contain plant components with antioxidant properties, which can slow the oxidation or "rusting" of LDL cholesterol. University research has confirmed that pecans also contain plant sterols, touted for their cholesterol-lowering ability. Although pecans contain mostly protein and fat, more than half the fat (about 60 percent) found in pecans is monounsaturated fat and approximately 30 percent is polyunsaturated fat - meaning that almost 90 percent of the fats in pecans are heart-healthy. In fact, the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans from the U.S. Department of Agriculture acknowledge that consumers can eat moderate amounts of fat, as long as they are of the unsaturated variety.

"Many have deprived themselves of the great taste and nutritional benefits of pecans because of a fear of fat," said Beth Hubrich, M.S., R.D. of the National Pecan Shellers Association. "Rest assured, the fats found in pecans are the good fats - the unsaturated fats a body needs to stay healthy," Hubrich said.

Source:  National Pecan Shellers Association

Going Low Carb? Go Nuts!

By: Kimberly Jack, MS, RD

Pecans are a healthful, naturally low carbohydrate food that you can feel good about including in your daily carb-restricted diet. Whether for a snack or a meal, pecans provide many nutritional benefits that can nicely complement a carb-controlled diet, some of which are:

CARB CONSCIOUS: Pecans are naturally low in carbohydrates…always have been, always will be. In fact, a handful of pecans (one ounce of pecans) contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates! That means that nutrient-dense pecans can add flavor, nutrition and disease-fighting properties to any diet that limits carbs. 

HIGH IN HEALTHY FAT: Pecans contain approximately 60 percent monounsaturated fat and 30 percent polyunsaturated fat. This means that almost 90 percent of the fats (oils) in pecans are heart-healthy! Not only will these fats help curb your appetite, they can help protect your heart. In fact, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) felt there was enough evidence of nuts' heart-healthy benefits that it approved the following health claim, “Scientific evidence suggests but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts (including pecans), as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease.”

CAPABLE OF LOWERING CHOLESTEROL: Many low carb diets allow high-saturated foods, which are known to raise blood cholesterol levels. However, pecans contain an abundance of unsaturated fats, and studies have shown that pecans can help lower cholesterol levels. Pecans also contain plant components with antioxidant properties, which can slow the oxidation or "rusting" of LDL (bad) cholesterol. And, a recent study has confirmed that pecans also contain plant sterols, which have been in the news recently for their cholesterol-lowering ability.

“NUT”RITION PACKED: It can be difficult to obtain all the nutrients you need when you follow a diet that severely restricts any nutrient (such as carbs). However, pecans provide a lot of nutritional bang for your buck—especially considering the few carbs that are present in pecans. Pecans contain over 19 vitamins and minerals – including vitamin A, vitamin E, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, several B vitamins and zinc. Just one ounce of pecans (a handful or about 20 halves) has more zinc – an important nutrient for proper growth and strong immunity – than a 3.5-ounce piece of skinless chicken. Most good sources of zinc are foods of animal origin, but pecans offer an excellent plant-based source. 

PLENTIFUL IN PROTEIN: Pecans belong to the protein group in the USDA’s Food Guide Pyramid, along with meat, poultry, fish, eggs and dried beans – a group of foods that are naturally low in carbohydrates. Whether they are used as a meat alternative or as a snack, pecans provide a healthful source of needed protein, which is essential for proper body function. 

FIBER-FILLED: One ounce of pecans has about the same amount of fiber as a medium-sized apple, and provides 10 percent of the recommended Daily Value for fiber. Fiber keeps you fuller longer and will keep your blood sugar steady (an important element to low-carb eating). 

WEIGHT CONTROL BENEFITS: Research suggests that pecans may help with weight control. One reason is their ability to help with satiety - which means that dieters and those looking to control their weight will stay fuller, longer after they eat pecans. Studies have also shown that consumers who eat nuts regularly are leaner than those who don’t eat nuts regularly, and suggest that nuts may increase the rate at which the body burns calories. 

Source: National Pecan Shellers Association

Lower Cholesterol

Pecans can double the cholesterol-lowering effectiveness of a traditional heart-healthy diet, according to a study published in The Journal of Nutrition, September 2001. An eight-week study at Loma Linda University found that a 'pecan' diet (which consisted of replacing 20 percent of the calories from the American Heart Association's Step I diet foods with pecans) lowered total cholesterol by 11.5%.

  1. 90% of the fats in pecans are unsaturated (about 60% monounsaturated/30% polyunsaturated)
  2. A serving of pecans (30g) provides about 25 percent more oleic acid than a serving of olive oil (one tablespoon)
  3. Pecans are cholesterol free 
  4. Pecans are sodium free 
  5. Pecans are fiber-rich 
  6. Pecans are a valuable plant protein source 
  7. Pecans have more than 19 vitamins & minerals 
  8. Pecans are an excellent source of gamma tocopherol, an important type of vitamin E 
  9. Pecans contain concentrated amounts of natural plant sterols, touted for their cholesterol-lowering ability 
  10. Pecans contain a variety of phytochemicals 

1. The pecan tree has been the Texas state tree since 1919. It is usually from 70 – 100 feet in height, but can grow to 150 feet.

2.  Astronauts took pecans to the moon in two Apollo missions.

3.  Pecans could improve your love life? If the body does not get enough zinc, it may have difficulty producing testosterone – a key hormone in initiating sexual desire in both men and women. Pecans provide nearly 10 percent of the recommended Daily Value for zinc. So, pass on the oysters and reach for a handful of pecans